Reproductive rights and freedoms are once again at the forefront for Americans after Alabama’s Supreme Court ruled that frozen embryos should be considered children, with implications going far beyond IVF alone. Impact Research partnered with Americans for Contraception to conduct a national survey that confirms the near-universal popularity of contraceptives and overwhelming support for ensuring that all Americans have the right to make their own choices about contraceptives. In the post-Dobbs era when everything is under attack, voters believe their access to contraception is at risk, and in a nationwide poll, likely voters across the demographic and partisan spectrum say that protecting access to contraception is deeply important to them.

Below are some key findings from the recent survey.

  • The Right to Contraception Act is incredibly popular and supported by eight-in-ten voters. By a 68-point margin, voters have a favorable view of the bill (81% favorable / 13% unfavorable), with three-fifths strongly in favor of it (61%).
  • This is not a niche or partisan issue: There’s majority support for this bill across party, racial, and generational lines, and among both men and women. Broad majorities of Democrats (94% favor / 4% oppose), Independents (76% favor / 17% oppose), and Republicans (68% favor / 20% oppose) view the bill favorably, along with both men (78% favor / 15% oppose) and women (84% favor / 11% oppose).

Looking by age, voters under 35 (79% favor / 15% oppose), 35-49 (84% favor / 9% oppose), 50-64 (81% favor / 12% oppose), and 65+ (80% favor / 14% oppose) all back the bill. The Right to Contraception Act is also popular among Black (83% favor / 11% oppose), Hispanic (79% favor / 14% oppose), white (81% favor / 13% oppose) and AAPI voters (79% favor / 14% oppose) alike.

  • This issue is personal – more than three-quarters of voters have used a form of contraception, and birth control is extremely popular, including emergency contraception. Seventy-seven percent of voters say they’ve used birth control, and both birth control (84% fav / 9% unfav) and emergency contraceptives like “Plan B” (67% fav / 19% unfav) are viewed positively by wide margins.
  • Voters believe it is very important to have the right to make their own decisions about how/when to use contraception. Eighty-eight percent (88%) of voters say it’s important to them that all Americans have the right to make their own decision about when to use contraception and what method they use, with 72% saying it’s very important to them. The same share says it’s important to them personally that all Americans have the right to obtain contraceptives of their choosing without government interference (88%), with 70% saying it’s very important.
  • Post-Dobbs, voters think their access to contraception is at risk, and the threat that the Supreme Court will overturn the constitutional right to contraception is real to them. Most voters believe a person’s access to contraception is at risk in their state (53% concerned), and they see the threat as even greater when thinking about other states (67% concerned). By a 28-point margin, voters say they’re concerned that the U.S. Supreme Court will overturn the constitutional right to contraception (61% concerned / 33% not concerned).
  • This elevates the issue of abortion. Most voters say it’s important to them personally that politicians are prevented from banning abortion and contraception (57%) – these are not separate priorities. Democrats and Independents say they want both protected by wide margins, while contraception matters considerably to Republicans.
  • When Democrats define the threat—that Republicans are against protecting access to contraception even as states are actively working to ban access—voters say they’ll be much less likely to support Republicans in Congress. When hearing that 195 House Republicans voted against The Right to Contraception Act, a majority of voters said they’d would be much less likely to support Republicans in Congress (64% less likely; 50% much less likely).
  • Protecting access to contraception is a winning issue for Democrats. It not only motivates key voters to cast their ballot in November, but it strengthens the Democratic coalition needed to win and brings swing voters into the fold. By a wide margin, voters say they’d be more likely to vote for their member of Congress if they support the Right to Contraception Act (53% more likely), and less likely to vote for them if they oppose it (58% less likely, with 46% much less likely).

Explore these results further in presentation format or in the full baseline.

Molly Murphy, President of Impact Research, discussed the poll on the ReidOut and in the New York Times.